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Welcome to our site! Interesting questions and answers about UNIX & Linux are what this site is all about. Let’s get some basics out of the way; skip ahead if you’ve already covered these. Register an account - New users sometimes skip past the sign-up page and post as a guest. If you register your account, you’ll have an easier time editing your own ...


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If the existing question is poorly formulated, edit it! Improvements are always welcome. If you think that the existing formulation is fine, you can still edit the question to add search fodder, e.g. with a paragraph “In other words, I'm asking how to <different formulation>”. If you really think that the question would be best served under multiple ...


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My take here is slightly different. I don't consider that question to be cross-posted at all. While it is true that posting the same question on multiple sites of the network is frowned upon, posting different versions of the same question to target the different audiences on each target site is not. This has been mentioned in various places by various Stack ...


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You can make many improvements to questions, but you should leave the intent of the OP as is. And diversity can be of interest as well. What you might consider as "The OP doesn't know what their problem is" might be because of you and the OP having a different background. I, e.g., tend to use the word directory and tend to think of Folder as some beginner (...


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See this meta post on the topic. Yes only English is allowed. If posts are in anything other than English they should be either translated by the OP or closed/deleted. Do posts have to be in English on Stack Exchange? *excerpted the highest UV'd answer there - The Stack Overflow Trilogy has an official policy on non-English questions: It is not, ...


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Will close when the bounty ends, and potentially migrate to AU depending on what happens on their end in the meantime There's less consensus on migrating it than I expected; sounds like we're going to leave both posts open on their respective sites


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Messages like the one you mention, or "Hello!", "Thanks" etc, are considered noise on the Stack Exchange network sites. SE aims to create a repository of knowledge in the form of questions and answers. It is not trying to be a forum where discussion occurs, so anything that doesn't actively contribute to the question is considered noise. That, in fact, is ...


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If the question is specific enough, I'd say go for it; those look like they probably have a short list of concrete reasons. It'd be nice if you didn't post 30 of them at once, and avoid things like "What are the advantages and disadvantages of using Linux?" where there are infinite possible answers


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I'm a little reluctant to disagree with the answers already posted by highly rated users, but I'll toss in a word of caution: Do your research first. If you have a whole series of these questions, I think it seems like you should start by finding a good guide to kernel configs/options (there are quite a few). Alternately, try and come up with a more ...


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I'd argue that's the intended effect. You should look at those posts and see if any of those are what you're going to ask, and so they should be shown at the first available place where enough information has been gathered to start showing them: where the title has been entered.


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In theory, we have one already, though it sometimes gets misused. A competent Kali could help themselves by: asking a good question if their question is "unfairly" closed as a duplicate of "I'm in over my head", they can do their best to identify how they are not in over their heads by editing their Question and hoping for reopen votes. I see that as a ...


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Both, although there's no need to make it a wiki. Post a question along the lines of "Why can't I fetch the gcc-doc package on Debian?" with a description of what goes wrong when you try without the non-free repos, and then post your own answer with the solution. Just try to keep them distinct; the question should really be a question somebody who doesn't ...


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To write a good, welcomed question, I would advise: keeping it on-topic to the main subject of our stack/group; not addressing several subjects at once, in a single question; researching the facts behorehand; making an honest effort to understand and solve the question at hand, before asking it; being brief but comprehensive; keeping on topic to the ...


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As one dumb user less experienced user to another: Make your question novel: most of the people on this site are wizards and they get bored by questions they've seen 10s or 100s or 1000s of times before. Make your question hard: Ensure that you've googled and binged and tried and failed and only then ask a question and tell everyone what you've tried ...


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If you've looked at the official documentation and you don't understand it or it doesn't have the information you want, then sure, go ahead and ask. That's kinda the whole point of having Stack Exchange.


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Yes, it can be appropriate to make questions more general so as to bring them to a wider audience, and use them as duplicate targets. As it says in the Stack Overflow blog post “The Wikipedia of Long Tail Programming Questions”: It is OK to edit a question to make it more general. However, don't go overboard. Sometimes it's difficult to make questions ...


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I think you need to be very very careful in doing these kinds of edits. I would suggest the default be to create a new question. The reason is pretty simple. Looking at your example, Kali Linux and Linux Mint may have different methods for recovering GRUB. One OP may have efi the other BIOS. Sure you can (and should) make a general question (like "What do I ...


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Renaming the definitive question strikes me as a good idea; not only does it make it a better search target, but when someone finds their question closed as a duplicate, it makes a lot more sense if the title of the duplicate is generic enough so that the connection is immediately apparent.


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Can I ask the question on Unix and Linux as suggested by an answer at Stack Overflow meta? Yes. Factors such as how $PATH is set on *nix systems including Ubuntu might be relevant, so it is entirely appropriate here.


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible