6

Chrome and chromium can mean many things on this site, but particularly

We have two questions about Chrome OS (if I haven't missed one), tagged . I suspect we'll have more in a few months. At the moment, there's no call for differentiating between Google Chrome OS (the OS from Google with non-free components) and Chromium OS (the open source parts of Chrome OS). I propose to use for the OS and only distinguish between the two editions if and when it turns out to be useful.

We have 17 questions tagged plus one tagged , all about the Chrome/Chromium browser family; is a synonym of . and should be merged, presumably into the most common , but I'm not sure chrome is the right name. Right now, the browser is a lot more popular than the OS, but the OS is more directly in our focus, so the ratio could change. Should the displayed version of the tag have a longer name?

  • I think the having the short name for the browser and a longer differentiated one for the OS is fine. Even if the question ratio changes here, since chromium was loose in the world as a browser before it got it's own OS, I think it's ok to have to specify the os but not the browser. – Caleb Jun 25 '11 at 9:21
3

Have you considered having the primary tags for each of these be the open-source project names and use the google short names and google prefix tags as aliases?

I think that prioritizing the tag as the open source root project hold some water. The majority of questions are likely related to the google specific package, but in a sense they are downstream bottlers even if they are also the upstream headwaters.

  • What does bottlers and headwaters mean (i.e. I don't understand your reasoning why they should be renamed to open-source equivalents). – Tshepang Jun 27 '11 at 9:28
  • 1
    Upstream and downstream are standard terms, I just added some word play. The chrome project is a basically a branding, re-packaging and patch set (that includes some extra proprietary functionality) of the chromium parent project. I was advocating tagging as the parent even through there are several derivatives and one of the derivatives is the widest used. The fact that Google also has their hands in the water upstream doesn't really matter. – Caleb Jun 27 '11 at 9:44
  • Yeah, makes a lot of sense. – Tshepang Jun 27 '11 at 10:02

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