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Both ElementaryOS(https://elementaryos.stackexchange.com/) and Ubuntu(https://askubuntu.com/) have their own stackexchange sites. This made me wonder why questions under the tags ubuntu and elementary-os are considered on topic when they have dedicated stackexchange sites for themeselves. Is there some reason for this because to me it seems unnecessary?

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  • Could you explain what the issue is a bit more clearly? Are you asking why we have the tags or why we consider the systems on topic? Anyone can create tags and the presence of a tag doesn't indicate anything at all about whether something is in scope.
    – terdon Mod
    Jan 6 at 12:49
  • I'm asking about why they are considered on topic. I'll edit my question to make it more clear.
    – Gagan
    Jan 6 at 12:51

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Our scope includes anything to do with Unix or Linux. Whether or not other sites also cover parts of our scope isn't relevant to whether something is on topic for us. Yes, Elementary OS and Ubuntu have their own sites, but that's a very small part of it. To take a simple example, bash questions are on topic at least the following sites, and probably more:

We also have questions about emacs, despite the existence of https://emacs.stackexchange.com, about vim, despite the existence of https://vim.stackexchange.com, we have questions about configuring servers, despite the existence of https://serverfault.com, the list goes on.

In short, there are several dozen (almost two hundred, actually) sites on the Stack Exchange network and many of them have overlapping scopes. As long as something is on topic here, the fact that it may also be on topic elsewhere is immaterial. Just like the fact that we exist shouldn't stop Stack Overflow from giving answers about shell scripts. We all coexist.

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    ... and it's up to the user asking what audience they want to have for their question (e.g. a generic Unix user/admin crowd, a programmer crowd, an Ubuntu user crowd, a server sysadmin crowd, etc.)
    – Kusalananda Mod
    Jan 7 at 7:56

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