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I am interested in getting a general overview of available file systems for Linux (specifically to be used for the root file system), with pros and cons of each, but I am wondering would that be considered too broad a topic for this website? This is as opposed to asking about a specific file system.

  • Sounds reasonable to me. – Faheem Mitha Jun 16 '17 at 9:30
  • Thanks, well I asked the question, so I'm hoping you're not the only one that believes it is suitable here it is and it's already got a vote to close! – BH2017 Jun 16 '17 at 9:41
  • If you ask a question on Meta, you should wait longer than an hour to get replies. Unless you're in a hurry, at least a day or two. – Faheem Mitha Jun 16 '17 at 9:45
  • Fair point, thanks. I was in a bit of a hurry, though. – BH2017 Jun 16 '17 at 9:47
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Without a very specific use case with explicit requirements mentioned, this would be a question that would be primarily opinion based and/or too broad, in my opinion.

It would be primarily opinion based, because Linux people have their favourite filesystems that they use for various reasons. Some swear by this filesystem, others by another filesystem, and sometimes on purely emotional (or other non-technical) grounds.

It would be too broad, because specific filesystems may be better for specific use cases, such as a private laptop, a server room RAID array, a high throughput genomic sequencing storage machine, a router, etc.

To alleviate these issues, the question would have to be on the form

I tried doing this on this kind of filesystem, but this happened. What filesystems would better handle this scenario?

The question "Filesystem for Gentoo root?" does this. The problem is specific: user has performance issues on a Gentoo workstation using ext4 when there are many small files.

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    And the list of filesystems changes, and their features change... – Jeff Schaller Jun 16 '17 at 10:30

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