-1

I've come up with a tag (per-directory-settings) for questions about configuration files that override or merge over one another based on an answer to this question if you think the name of it sucks, please come up with a better one; and tag anything you think this may apply to.

Off the top of my head I can think of .gitignore, and Apache2 .htaccess. If you come up with other ones please tag them accordingly.

The tag is needed because the concept exists in so many different pieces of software (git, apache2, vim, emacs). People could figure out if a piece of software supports such a functionality just by looking at the tag on a relevant question. Or by filtering question on both the name of the software and the tag I'm proposing

  • 1
    Please edit your question and i) fix the link so that it points to the U&L tag and not the SO tag; and ii) explain why you think such a tag is needed. – terdon May 11 '16 at 16:38
  • @terdon The tag is needed because the concept exists in so many different pieces of software. People could figure out if a piece of software supports such a functionality just by looking at the tag on a relevant question. Or by filtering question on both the name of the software and the tag I'm proposing. – leeand00 May 11 '16 at 16:40
  • 3
    Personally, I really don't see any point to this tag but that's just my opinion. However, please edit your question to explain why you think it would be useful, that way others can understand your reasoning. – terdon May 11 '16 at 16:44
  • 3
    I have to concur with @terdon, I don't really see the point to adding such a tag either. – slm May 11 '16 at 16:48
  • I think that people would look for a particular piece of software based on its primary function (printing, web pages, etc) not based on how it configures itself. Also, while unix.sx is a trove of UNIX knowledge, I'd hesitate to consider it authoritative on how every possible piece of software is configured. – Jeff Schaller May 11 '16 at 22:05
4

There are two main uses of tags (in no particular order, to avoid the question of which is primary):

  • Tags aid in searching for questions before asking, when looking for duplicates, etc.

  • Tags direct questions to the relevant experts (e.g., following a tag)

Also, remember you only get five tags maximum per question. So they can't be an index of every concept in the question.

Does this proposed tag aid anyone in searching for a question? I'd guess not. If you want to know how to block access to a directory in Apache, you'll look for . Or maybe htaccess if you know the name. Very unlikely you'll even think of this tag to search with, or find value in it (maybe it would have been better to use a <Directory …> block, not an htaccess file?)

Are there experts? I think not, as different programs handle things so differently. Git looks in a file per repository, Apache in every directory, mpv in every directory plus one for every media file, etc. All the syntax is different. Which configuration options you can put in each location varies. If you want to know about htaccess files, ask an Apache expert. If you want to know about managing configuration (e.g., keeping track of it all), ask a configuration expert. What would you ask a per directory settings expert, if such a person existed?

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .