5
  1. I asked a question, and it was put on hold. Maybe it wasn't clear, but it was clear enough to get the solution in the comments. How can I "un-hold" it now I edited the question? What have I done wrong?

  2. Someone answered in the comments that I should post in on Stack Overflow and not here in the Unix / Linux forum. But the problem is not about my code, it's about installing something in Linux. If I have a similar question in the future, where should I post it?

  3. I've posted in total two questions, and for both, the solutions were posted in comments, so I can't accept them. Is that normal?

  4. What title should I have put for this post? Since English is not my native language it's a bit difficult for me.

  • On a side note, the single most important thing you can do is precisely what you just did: come here, to meta, and ask. Don't worry, the rules are confusing at first but you get used to it. Just ask again, either here or in our chat room (once you have at least 20 reputation points) if you have any questions about how the site works and how to ask well received questions. We'll be happy to help you learn the rules of the site. – terdon Sep 21 '15 at 23:09
3
  1. You can flag the question (there's a link just underneath it) and ask for it to be reopened. It's open now

  2. It's kind of an edge case, but I would say those questions are probably better off on Stack Overflow, since they require programming knowledge to solve (particularly the one that was closed)

  3. It depends; frequently people post answers in the comments if they're not sure if they're correct (which they shouldn't do, but they do). In this case it seems like the poster was confident they were correct, so I don't know why they posted a comment

  4. I don't think the title really matters for a one-off meta post. "What's wrong with this question?", maybe, but yours is fine too

  • For #3 - If the solution was posted as a comment, I guess the OP could ask to post it as the answer to accept it, this will make the question not to be unsolved. – tachomi Sep 24 '15 at 13:44

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